Maine Acoustic Festival 2018

Welcome to all MAF participants! 

This year we'll focus on worksongs old and new.  And since it is the Maine acoustic festival we'll focus on worksongs from here in the Pine Tree State. Two old, two new. And one bonus if we can get to it.

Have a listen (over and over!) to try to get these songs into your head before we start. Try to work out what the different voices are doing for melody and harmony. If you memorize the lyrics you'll be way ahead. Everyone will get a solo line or two, so be thinking about which "call" lines you want as your own.

You will end up singing most of the parts during the course of the weekend so it's important that everyone listen hard to each of the melody and harmony lines to understand how the songs work. 


Song 1: Roll Boys Roll
Traditional Sea Shanty
from Stan Hugill's book, "Shanties of the Seven Seas"

This song comes from Stan Hugill and his days aboard tall ships during the final days of the age of sail, but has been heavily folk-processed by me. I added the guitar part to help you get an idea of the chord progression we'll be using. 

Oh! Sally Brown, she's the gal for me boys
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Oh! Sally Brown is the gal for me boys
Way high, Sally Brown

Headed out, we're goin' down south, boys
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Headed out, we're goin' down south, boys
Way high, Sally Brown

We're headed down to Trinidad to see Miss Lucy Loo
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Headed' down to Trinidad to see Miss Lucy Loo
Way high, Sally Brown

She's lovely up aloft, and she's lovely down below
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
She's tells me that she loves me, that's all I want to know
Way high, Sally Brown!

Old Captain Barker, how do you store yer cargo?
Roll Boys! Roll boys roll!
Some I stow forward, boys, and some I stow after
Way high, Sally Brown!

There's forty fathoms or more below boys
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Forty fathoms or more below boys
Way high, Sally Brown!

Oh, way high ya, and up she rises
Roll Boys! Roll boys roll!
Way high ya, and the blocks is different sizes
Way high, Sally Brown!

Oh, one more pull, don't ya hear the captain calling?
Roll, boys! Roll boys roll!
Oh, one more pull, that's the end of all the hauling
Way high, Sally Brown!

 

Song 2: Fox in the Night
Original, by Elsie Gawler
(Recording to come)

Everyone sings text in bold.
Non-bold text gets improvised after the first few verses

Follow, follow that fox in the night
Follow, sure do you right
And we'll run run run til the morning light
And we'll run run run til the morning light
And we'll run run run til the morning light
And we'll run run run til the morning light


Song 3: Sing Round
As sung by John Gawler

This classic woods song was discovered by Greg Boardman in the great book "The Maine Woods Songster", collected by Phillips Barry. It has been folk-processed by John Gawler.

When we go into the woods
Sing round brave boys,
Sing round brave boys
When we go into the woods
Jolly brave boys are we
And when we go into the woods
We're looking for the timber that what's good

And when the choppers begin to chop
Sing round brave gals
Sing round brave gals
When the choppers begin to chop
Jolly brave gals are we
And when the choppers begin to chop
They'll take the sound and they'll leave the rot

And when the swampers start to clear
They'll show the teamsters where to clear

And when we've got them on the sled
The oxen the pulls the logs ahead

When we get them to the stream
We'll knock out the fid and we'll roll them in

Now when we drive them to the mill
We'll call for apple cider and we'll drink our fill

Now when at last we get our pay
The merchant takes us by the hand, says here are the goods at your command


Song 4: Empathize Strategize
Original, written by Bennett Konesni

I was inspired recently to write a song for marches.
The idea is that the caller will insert various words that end in -ize throughout the song, especially in the B section.

A.
Empathize, Strategize, Mobilize, Harmonize
Empathize, Strategize, Mobilize, Harmonize
Empathize, Strategize, Mobilize, Harmonize
Empathize, Strategize, Mobilize, Harmonize

B.
Empathize Empathize
Strategize Strategize
Mobilize Mobilize
Harmonize Harmonize
Empathize Empathize
Strategize Strategize
Mobilize Mobilize
For all our Allies
 


Song 5: Sweep Chimney-Sweep
By Bob & Jim Copper of the Copper Family, Rottingdean, Sussex, England

If we have time I'd like to sing this great song by one of the great families of singing. Laboring songs from the english tradition, this family of shepherds has passed down songs for hundreds of years, lightly folk-processed by me.

Sweep Chimney sweep is the common cry I keep,
If you can but rightly understand me.
With my brush, broom and my rake, with my brush, broom and my rake,
See what cleanly work I make,
With my hoe, hoe, hoe and my hoe
And it's sweep, chimney sweep for me.

Girls come unto the door I look as black as any Moor,
I'm as constant and true as the day
Although my face is black, although my face is black,
I can give as good a smack,
And there's no one, no one, no one there's no one
And there's no one shall call me on hire.

Girls come unto the door I look jet black you can be sure,
Go and fetch me something that I might swallow
I can climb up to the top, I can climb up to the top,
Without a ladder or a rope,
And it's there you, there you, there you and there you,
And it's there you will hear me halloa.

Now here I do stand with my hoe all in my hand
Like a soldier that's on the sentery
I will work for a better sort, I will work for a better sort
And kindly thank them for it.
I will work, work, work and I'll work
And I'll work for none but gentery.